Aug 26, 2019  
2017 - 2018 Catalog of Courses 
    
2017 - 2018 Catalog of Courses [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Environmental Studies


Coordinator: Rebecca Austin
Email: austin_r@fortlewis.edu 

Environmental Studies Faculty:
Professor: Peterm McCormick
Associate Professors: Rebecca Austin
Assistant Professor: Kathleen Hilimire

Affiliated Faculty:
Professors: Cynthia Dott, Janine Fitzgerald, Andrew Gulliford, and Larry Hartsfield and William (Scott) White
Associate Professors: David Blake, Bradley Clark, Rebecca Clausen, and Shawn Fullmer
Assistant Professors: Ruth Alminas, Cody Ferguson, Anthony Nocella, Jesse Tune, and Lorraine Taylor

Environmental Studies  is an interdisciplinary degree program that provides essential background on issues pertaining to culture and society, political science, and the natural sciences, preparing students for careers focused on environmental issues. Environmental Studies is unique in that it unites a broad array of disciplines, and students take courses in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities in order to gain a broad understanding of human and environmental relations, policy, and problem solving. The curriculum includes introductory coursework in Environmental Studies and distribution requirements in Human-Environment Relations and Policy, as well as Scientific Literacy. The knowledge gained in the curriculum is applied in a series of upper division research and experiential courses (ENVS 320 , ENVS 395 , ENVS 410  and ENVS 496 ). This four-semester capstone experience for Environmental Studies majors requires at least 150 hours of community-based learning and research, and directed research through the Environmental Colloquium and Senior Seminar courses. These opportunities allow students to develop expertise in a particular aspect of Environmental Studies and provide them with valuable field experience that will guide them and set them apart from the competition in their career pursuits.

The major is designed to prepare students for graduate studies or careers in environmental management, public policy, environmental justice, government, and law, to name a few, as well as careers in policy, tribal government, environmental management, sustainability, regional planning and local food production, for example. Students will be introduced to numerous career options through courses like Introduction to Environmental Studies and Community Internship.

Environmental Policy Minor

The Environmental Policy minor  would be an excellent addition to any student at Fort Lewis College, majoring outside of Environmental Studies. By completing the Environmental Policy minor, students enhance their preparation for graduate school or a career in areas such as environmental management, public policy, environmental justice, government, law, and tribal government. As described for the Environmental Studies major, the Environmental Policy minor is interdisciplinary and is designed to prepare dynamic leaders who can negotiate the ecological and sociocultural aspects of complex environmental problems. Students are strongly encouraged to work closely with their advisors and faculty mentors to ensure they design a course of study that best suits their career goals and fulfills all prerequisites and general education requirements in a timely fashion. Students interested in completing the minor should contact the Program Coordinator to learn about the courses, internships, and practicum opportunities.

There are two required components to the minor:

1. Students select 18 credits from a list of existing courses representing the diverse perspectives on environmental policy (see below). 

2. Students must take PS 130  at the beginning of their minor-related coursework and ENVS 395  during their junior or senior year.  The latter course is one in which students and faculty of varied backgrounds come together to work on joint projects related to local, regional, or national environmental concerns.

Major in Environmental Studies

Environmental Studies Major  

Minor in Environmental Studies

Environmental Policy Minor